Education Divides Rather Than Unites Society

The quality of education being delivered varies across private and public schools. Private schools being more costly can only be afforded by the relatively affluent class, whereas, public schools aren’t a burden on the wallet and therefore preferred by the common man. Although some public schools do manage to impart education of a high standard, most pale in comparison to private schools. With more funds to invest in the education of its pupils, private schools enjoy a better reputation than public schools. The reputation of the school matters a lot when it comes to college admissions where once again public school students are at a disadvantage.

In some developing countries, such as Pakistan and India, women in general and the rural woman in particular, are discouraged from attaining education. Male children are given preference when it comes to sending children to school, particularly if the household has a limited budget. Even educated individuals make such absurd choices and such practices have secluded women not only from schools but also from the workplace.

The living conditions of an individual dictate whether he/she would be able to complete his/her education or not. Therefore, for a person, who can not even fulfill his basic necessities attaining education is a much more difficult objective than it is for a person living a relatively luxurious life. Children belonging to such impoverished families find it increasingly difficult to pursue education while trying to earn bread and butter for their families. Most of them are unable to complete their primary education, not because they chose to do so but because circumstances dictated so. In such circumstances education is not assisting such individuals from breaking through the poverty cycle and thus leading to a wider gap between the rich and the poor, the educated and the uneducated.

Education standards also differ across geographical boundaries, across continents and across poles. The West is generally envied by the East for its quality of education, the reason why a number of students from the East choose colleges in the West (only the rich are able to do so). Similarly those living in rural areas do not have access to the same quality of education as those who reside in urban areas. Improvements in technology have to a very limited extent countered this issue. However, the pace at which technology is improving is remarkable and soon enough location would not be an issue.

Attaining an education might be a difficult journey for some and indeed for others an impossible one, but education does play a pivotal role in guaranteeing higher chances of employment and better paying jobs. If education is made more accessible and the quality that is imparted more uniform such that the rich are not advantaged and the poor not disadvantaged and that gender does not determine one’s chances of becoming educated and that an individual’s location doesn’t dictate the quality of education he/she is to receive, then only can education unite society.



Source by Ammad Ali

Daily Life Therapy (Higashi) for Autism

Daily Life Therapy (DLT) method also known as Higashi was developed in the 1960s by Dr. Kiyo Kitahara at the Musashino Higashi Gakuen School in Tokyo, Japan. She developed the method through what she learned from teaching a child with autism in a mainstream education kindergarten class. Her main objective was to develop self-esteem of the autism children and create emotional security for them.

Higashi is a Japanese word which means ‘hope’ and it is a holistic approach to integrate autism children with other normal children to study together in one group. There are a few methods used in this approach such as providing a systematic education by involving group dynamics, modelling, physical activities, art, music, academic, and vocational training.

How DLT (Higashi) works

Behavior management in DLT does not involve the measurement of neglect, punishment, time-out procedures or through medication. DLT is not to treat or to cure Autism Syndrome Disorder (ASD), but is believed to provide other important benefits such as improving the skill of ability, flexibility and function appropriately when they are with internal community and also activities involving family. Activities are group-oriented and highly structured with an emphasis on learning transmitted from child to child through synchronisation and imitation.

The Higashi approach emphasises group learning in the context of a programs which includes vigorous physical activity to develop both strength and concentration. Physical activity is one of the academic curriculum’s of children with autism and it is a challenge for their ability level as well as to increase their interest to engage in activities conducted. Practitioners believe that through exercise, children will be able to control the level of body coordination and at the same time control their behavior. Physical activities such as exercises and games have the positive impact on behavioral, psychological, and physical specifically in individual with ASD. DLT programs are normally using an appropriate instruction, equipment, and daily movement activities such as walking, running, climbing, and jumping to improve gross motor skills which allowing children with autism learn to acclimate to the stimulating world around them.

Among the main principles of Daily Life Therapy (Higashi) are as follows:

i. The focus of curriculum is on movement activities, music and arts.

ii. Children engage in vigorous physical activities throughout the day.

iii. Instructions are group oriented, example all children in the class are taught the same thing and at the same time.

iv. Children learn through imitation, for example they imitate exactly what their teacher do.

v. Routine activities are very highly structured.

DLT using the Higashi approach is an educational program for children with autism based on three interrelated principles: vigorous physical exercise, emotional stability and intellectual stimulation. By using these three core principles of DLT, children with autism learn to naturally focus their attention, diffuse their energy, feel calm and relaxed, and allowing them to learn without the need for medication. DLT also provides other important benefits such as improved coping skills, increased flexibility and improved appropriate functioning within the home community and family events. The ultimate goal of DLT is to archive lifelong inclusion in the community and high quality of life.



Source by Chandramogan Ramaiah

Autism – Ayurvedic Herbal Treatment

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by problems with social interactions, impaired verbal and non-verbal communication and a pattern of repetitive behavior with narrow, restricted interests. Boys are more likely than girls to have autism. Though the exact cause for autism is unknown, genetics plays an important role, and environmental, immunological and metabolic factors may have a contributory role.

Behavioral therapy, coupled with specific education, and periodical assessment by a multi-disciplinary team, form the mainstay in the management of children with autism. Additional Ayurvedic herbal treatment can be given to reduce troublesome symptoms and improve cognition. Herbal medicines can be given safely for long periods even to children, and therefore, this therapy is specially beneficial for children with autism.

The brain tissue can be treated by correcting the metabolism of the “Majja” dhatu in the body. Medicines useful in this condition are: Pancha-Tikta-Ghruta Guggulu, Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia), Amalaki (Emblica officinalis) and Musta (Cyperus rotundus).

In addition, Ayurveda mentions a category of medicines known as “Medhya”, which improve the working capacity of the brain. This category includes medicines like Mandukparni (Centella asiatica), Yashtimadhuk (Glycerrhiza glabra), Guduchi, Padma (Nelumbo nucifera), Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri), Vacha (Acorus calamus) and Shankhpushpi (Convolvulus pluricaulis).

Normally, a combination of several medicines is used in the treatment and management of autism. In addition to the two categories of medicines mentioned above, other medicines like Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) and Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus) are also used routinely. Autistic children usually require a high dose of herbal medicines to get good results.

In addition to oral treatment, autistic children benefit from massage treatment all over the body using medicated oils like Chandan-Bala-Laxadi oil and Mahanarayan oil. Ayurvedic Panchkarma procedures like “Shirodhara” and “Nasya” are beneficial for the problems related to autism, but may be more suitable for older children and adults.

Treatment has to be tailor-made for each child according to the severity and presentation of symptoms. In addition, different children may respond differently to the herbal medicines. Parents should avoid the temptation to treat their children on their own.



Source by Abdulmubeen Mundewadi